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 MEDICAL

There are various drugs for the treatment of different diseases.

The Liver diseases have been listed down in alphabetical order. Click on the alphabet to read more about the diseases.

 
A
B
 
Hepatic hemangioma Hepatitis B
Hemochromatosis Contraindications and side-effects of medications
Hemophilia Hepatitis C
Hepatitis A
 

Hepatic hemangioma

There is no specific medication indicated for treatment

Hemochromatosis

Treatment Indication Dose
Deferoxamine This drug binds to and helps rid the body of iron. However, it is almost never necessary because of the ease and efficacy of phlebotomy therapy (removal of blood).

500-1000 mg by intramuscular injection once daily.

   

Hemophilia

Treatment Indication Dose
Desmopressin This medication can be used in patients with mild hemophilia A to increase levels of factor 8, a component of blood that helps in blood clotting.

0.3 micrograms per kg of body weight by intravenous or subcutaeous administration (maximum 20 micrograms) diluted in 50 mL of normal saline infused over 20 to 30 minutes.Alternative is 150-300 micrograms by intranasal spray (1 spray in each nostril).

Tranexaminic acid This medication prevents the breakdown of blood clots, and is used to stabilize bleeding from nosebleeds, menstruation, and oral cavity bleeding. 25 mg per kg of body weight by mouth or by intravenous administration every six to eight hours.
Aminocaproic acid This medication prevents the breakdown of blood clots, and is used to stabilize bleeding from nosebleeds, menstruation, and oral cavity bleeding. 75 to 100 mg per kg of body weight by mouth or by intravenous administration every six hours (maximum single dose 3 to 4 g).

Factor 8 or 9 replacement products These products are synthetic analogs of the components of blood that help in clotting and are deficient in hemophilia A or B.
   

Hepatitis A

There is no specific medication indicated for treatment.

Hepatitis B

Treatment Indication Dose
Interferon The main role of interferon is treatment of young patients with well compensated liver disease, who do not wish to be on long-term treatment, and in whom drug resistance may limit their treatment options in the future.

5 million units once daily or 10 MU three times a week by subcutaneous administration or intramuscular injection for 16 to 32 weeks (if also infected with hepatitis E) or 12 to 24 weeks (if not infected with hepatitis E).

Pegylated interferon The main role of interferon is treatment of young patients with well compensated liver disease, who do not wish to be on long-term treatment, and in whom drug resistance may limit their treatment options in the future. 180 mcg by subcutaneous administration once weekly for 48 weeks.
Lamivudine Its main role currently is in patients who also have HIV, and for short-term treatment in patients who are receiving cancer chemotherapy. Also, this medication is cheaper than the other options. 100 mg by mouth once daily.
Adevofir The most important role of adefovir is in the treatment of patients with lamivudine-resistant HBV. 10 mg by mouth once daily.
Entecavir Entecavir has a more important role in primary treatment of HBV than in patients with lamivudine-resistant HBV. Entecavir may also have an important role in patients with decompensated cirrhosis because of its potent antiviral activity and low rate of drug resistance. However, it is a new drug and its safety as well as rate of drug resistance with long-term use is unknown. 0.5 – 1 mg by mouth once daily.
   



Contraindications and side-effects of medications

Medication Reasons not to take this medicine Side-effects
Adefovir If you have an allergy to adefovir or any other part of this medicine.

If you are breast-feeding.

Worsening kidney function.

Headache.

Nausea or vomiting. Small frequent meals, frequent mouth care, sucking hard, sugar-free candy, or chewing sugar-free gum may help.

Diarrhea.

Aminocaproic acid If you have an allergy to aminocaproic acid or any other part of this medicine. Headache.

Nausea or vomiting. Small frequent meals, frequent mouth care, sucking hard, sugar-free candy, or chewing sugar-free gum may help.

Belly pain.

Nasal congestion.
Deferoxamine If you have an allergy to deferoxamine or any other part of this medicine.

If you have severe kidney disease.
Bluish fingernails, lips, or skin.

Blurred vision or other problems with vision.

Convulsions (seizures).

Difficulty in breathing or fast breathing

Fast heartbeat

Hearing problems Pain or swelling at place of injectionRedness or flushing of skin, skin rash, hives, or itching.

Diarrhea.

Nausea or vomiting. Small frequent meals, frequent mouth care, sucking hard, sugar-free candy, or chewing sugar-free gum may help.

Difficulty with urination.

Fever.

Leg cramps, stomach and muscle cramps.

Unusual bleeding or bruising.

Deferoxamine may cause the urine to turn orange-rose in color.
Desmopressin Do not give this medicine to a child younger than 6 years of age.

If you have an allergy to desmopressin acetate or any other part of this medicine.
Headache.

Belly pain.

Nausea or vomiting. Small frequent meals, frequent mouth care, sucking hard, sugar-free candy, or chewing sugar-free gum may help.
Entecavir If you have an allergy to entecavir or any other part of this medicine.

If you are breast-feeding.
Increased liver enzymes.

Blood or sugar in the urine.

Headache.

Nausea or vomiting. Small frequent meals, frequent mouth care, sucking hard, sugar-free candy, or chewing sugar-free gum may help.Diarrhea.
Interferon If you have an allergy to interferon or any other part of this medicine.

If you are pregnant or breast-feeding.
Anxiety, depression, trouble sleeping, difficulty concentrating.

Black, tarry stools, blood in stools.

Confusion.

Cough or hoarseness.

Fever or chills.

Lower back or side pain.

Painful or difficult urination, blood in urine.

Pinpoint red spots on skin, redness at place of injection, unusual bleeding or bruising.

Chest pain, irregular heartbeat.

Numbness or tingling of fingers, toes, or face.

Abdominal pain.

Aching muscles.

Decreased appetite.

Diarrhea.

Dizziness.

Headache.

Heartburn or indigestion.

Nausea or vomiting. Small frequent meals, frequent mouth care, sucking hard, sugar-free candy, or chewing sugar-free gum may help.

Pain in back or joints.

Sore throat.

General feeling of tiredness or weakness.

Interferon alfacon-1 may cause a temporary loss of some hair. After treatment has ended, normal hair growth should return.
Lamivudine If you have an allergy to lamivudine or any other part of this medicine.

If you are pregnant or may be pregnant.

If you are breast-feeding.
Headache.

Nausea or vomiting. Small frequent meals, frequent mouth care, sucking hard, sugar-free candy, or chewing sugar-free gum may help.

Diarrhea.

Irritated pancreas can rarely occur.
Tranexaminic acid If you have an allergy to tranexaminic acid or any other part of this medicine.

If you have defective color vision.

If you are actively bleeding in your brain.
Nausea or vomiting. Small frequent meals, frequent mouth care, sucking hard, sugar-free candy, or chewing sugar-free gum may help.

Diarrhea.

Blurred vision

Low blood pressure

Blood clot in legs

Kidney failure
   

Hepatitis C

Treatment Indication Dose
Interferon alpha or pegylated interferon These medications should preferably be administered within clinical trials.

5 million units by subcutaneous administration once daily for four weeks followed by 5 million units by subcutaneous administration three times a week for 20 weeks.

Ribavarin This medication should preferably be administered within clinical trials, usually in combination with interferon.

500-600 mg by mouth twice a day for 48 weeks in combination with pegylated interferon 2a-alpha.

Alternative is 400 mg by mouth once daily for 1 year in combination with pegylated interferon 2b-alpha.

Alternative is 400-600 mg by mouth in the morning then 600 mg by mouth in the evening for 48 weeks in combination with interferon alpha 2b.

   

 

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