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 MEDICAL

There are various drugs for the treatment of different diseases.

The Liver diseases have been listed down in alphabetical order. Click on the alphabet to read more about the diseases.

 
A
B
 
Galactosemia Gallbladder cancer
Gallstones Gilbert's syndrome
   
 


Galactosemia:

There is no specific medication indicated for treatment (except for excluding galactose from the diet, and supportive treatment)

Gallstones:

Treatment Indication Dose
Ursodeoxycholic acid 1) Patients with gallstones and typical symptoms who are not candidates for surgical removal of the gallbladder

2) Patients with atypical symptoms but with gallstones detected in the gallbladder

8-10 mg per kilogram of body weight by mouth in 2-3 divided doses daily.

Meperidine Used to treat infections that can develop when a stone from the gallbladder gets trapped in the bile duct. 5-10 mg by intravenous administration every 5 minutes used as needed for pain.
Ketorolac Used to control severe belly pain caused by gallstone disease (acute biliary colic) in the emergency room setting.Tends to have less side effects than meperidine. 30-60 mg by intramuscular injection once.
Levofloxacin
Used to treat infections that can develop when a stone from the gallbladder gets trapped in the bile duct. 250-500 mg by mouth by mouth or by intravenous administration once daily.
Ibuprofen Used to control belly pain caused by gallstone disease once the diagnosis has been established 400 mg by mouth every 4-6 hours used as needed for pain.
   


Gallbladder cancer:

Although many chemotherapy regimens have been tried to prevent cancer recurrence after surgery, there is no clear data to suggest that any of these drugs improves survival.

Contraindications and side effects of medications

Medication Reasons not to take this medicine Side effects
Ibuprofen If you have an allergy to ibuprofen or any other part of this medicine.

If you are more than 24 weeks pregnant.

Belly pain

Nausea or vomiting. Small frequent meals, frequent mouth care, sucking hard, sugar-free candy, or chewing sugar-free gum may help.

Black stools.

Diarrhea.Constipation. More liquids, regular exercise, or a fiber-containing diet may help. Talk with healthcare provider about a stool softener or laxative.

Ketorolac If you have an allergy to ketorolac tromethamine or any other part of this medicine.

If you have any of the following conditions: Bleeding in the brain, bleeding problems, hole in the gastrointestinal tract, kidney disease, nasal polyps, recent gastrointestinal bleeding, ulcer disease, or use before major surgery.

If you are taking any of these medicines: Aspirin, probenecid, or any nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).

If you are more than 24 weeks pregnant.

If you are breast-feeding.
Headache.

Belly pain.

Nausea or vomiting. Small frequent meals, frequent mouth care, sucking hard, sugar-free candy, or chewing sugar-free gum may help.

Black stools.

Diarrhea.

Eye irritation.
Meperedine If you have an allergy to meperidine or any other part of this medicine.

If you have taken isocarboxazid, phenelzine, or tranylcypromine in the last 14 days. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (eg, isocarboxazid, phenelzine, and tranylcypromine) must be stopped 14 days before this medicine is started. Taking the two together could cause dangerously high blood pressure.
Feeling lightheaded, sleepy, having blurred vision, or a change in thinking clearly. Avoid driving, doing other tasks or activities that require you to be alert or have clear vision until you see how this medicine affects you.

Feeling dizzy. Rise slowly over several minutes from sitting or lying position. Be careful climbing.

Nausea or vomiting. Small frequent meals, frequent mouth care, sucking hard, sugar-free candy, or chewing sugar-free gum may help.

Constipation. More liquids, regular exercise, or a fiber-containing diet may help. Talk with healthcare provider about a stool softener or laxative.
N-Acetylcysteine
If you have an allergy to acetylcysteine or any other part of this medicine. Nausea or vomiting. Small frequent meals, frequent mouth care, sucking hard, sugar-free candy, or chewing sugar-free gum may help.

Cough.
Ursodeoxycholic acid If you have an allergy to ursodeoxycholic acid or any other part of this medicine. Headache

Dizziness
   


Gilbert's Syndrome

This is a benign condition for which no specific treatment is required.


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