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SURGICAL
Liver Resection Cholecystectomy
Liver Transplantation
 
 

Liver Resection

Liver resection means removal of a portion of the liver. It is the most common type of surgery performed on liver. The most typical indication for liver resection is a cancer of liver. Tumors (cancer) can be

primary (developed in the liver)or

metastatic (developed in another organ, then migrated to the liver).

Metastasis to the liver comes mainly from colon. The single tumor or more than one tumor confined to either left or right side of the liver can be successfully resected with 5-year survival as high as 60

Surgeons doing liver resection for tumor aims at completely removing the tumor and the appropriate surrounding normal liver tissue without leaving any tumor behind. This option is limited to patients with one or two small (3cm or less) tumors and excellent liver function, ideally without associated cirrhosis. Unfortunately very few patients fit this criteria and hence undergo liver resection. Moreover, few patients with previously compromised liver functions can develop liver failure. Even in carefully selected patients, about 10% of them are expected to die shortly after surgery, usually as a result of liver failure. Therefore careful selection of the patients is very important.

Another major indication for liver resection is in benign tumors of the liver (cyst, adenoma, hemangioma). can be successfully managed by liver resection as well. The small superficial tumors can be removed laparoscopically (by making small punctures in the abdomen while viewing through a video camera) reducing the large scars, longer hospital stay and discomfort to the patient. But not all tumors can be removed laparoscopically and surgeons opinion regarding this hence becomes important.

And most noble indication of liver resections is in people willing to donate part of their liver to a loved one.

Liver resection may be performed

laparoscopically, using minimally invasive techniques,

using open surgical methods.

The choice depends on a variety of factors, such as the type of tumor and location, among other things.

A liver resection takes approximately 4-5 hours. Though not always, but it can be performed without blood transfusion. The hospital stay is about 5 days and complete recovery occurs in 5-6 weeks. The resected liver regenerates to its preoperative size in 6-8 weeks.

Excellent results from liver resections are usually achieved.

 

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